Cmarsium Overdrive

eataku:

Cherry blossom season is upon us… which means there will not only be a lot more drunks in the parks and on the trains across Japan, but more seasonal selections at Japanese fast food joints!
McDonald’s launches their latest offering, the Sakura Teritama burger, this Friday, March 21st.
The Sakura Teritama is a teriyaki-glazed beef patty topped with a fried egg and special “cherry blossom mayo sauce”, all on a special pink bun.
It will be available daily from 10:30am to 4:59pm only, encouraging people to pick their up before “hanami”, or traditional cherry blossom viewing parties.
Oddly enough, the campaign does not mention price yet.
Image via mcdonalds.co.jp

eataku:

Cherry blossom season is upon us… which means there will not only be a lot more drunks in the parks and on the trains across Japan, but more seasonal selections at Japanese fast food joints!

McDonald’s launches their latest offering, the Sakura Teritama burger, this Friday, March 21st.

The Sakura Teritama is a teriyaki-glazed beef patty topped with a fried egg and special “cherry blossom mayo sauce”, all on a special pink bun.

It will be available daily from 10:30am to 4:59pm only, encouraging people to pick their up before “hanami”, or traditional cherry blossom viewing parties.

Oddly enough, the campaign does not mention price yet.

Image via mcdonalds.co.jp

(via luckypeach)

cinyma:

The making of Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

(via thetadoctor)

My Veronica Mars download code just came, I can take the rest of the day off now right?

new-aesthetic:

Beyond Verbal, Others Use Voice Analysis to Assess Emotions - WSJ.com

TEL AVIV—Beyond Verbal Communications Ltd., a voice-recognition software developer here, is rolling out an app promising something Siri can’t yet deliver: a readout on how you’re feeling. Called Moodies, it lets a smartphone user speak a few words into the phone’s mike to produce, about 20 seconds later, an emotional analysis. Beyond Verbal executives say the app is mostly for self-diagnosis—and a bit of fun: It pairs a cartoon face with each analysis, and users can share the face on Facebook or in a tweet or email. But the app is coming out as the company and other developers—many clustered in Tel Aviv—push increasingly sophisticated hardware and software they say can determine a person’s emotional state through analysis of his or her voice. These companies say the tools can also detect fraud, screen airline passengers and help a call-center technician better deal with an irate customer. And they can be used to keep tabs on employees or screen job applicants. One developer, Tel Aviv-based Nemesysco Ltd., offers what it calls “honesty maintenance” software aimed at human-resource executives. The firm says that by analyzing a job applicant’s voice during an interview, the program can help identify fibs. That’s raising alarm among many voice-analysis experts, who question the accuracy of such on-the-spot interpretations. It’s also raising worries among privacy advocates, who say such technology—especially if it is being rolled out in cheap, easy-to-use smartphone apps—could be a fresh threat to privacy in the digital age.

new-aesthetic:

Beyond Verbal, Others Use Voice Analysis to Assess Emotions - WSJ.com

TEL AVIV—Beyond Verbal Communications Ltd., a voice-recognition software developer here, is rolling out an app promising something Siri can’t yet deliver: a readout on how you’re feeling. Called Moodies, it lets a smartphone user speak a few words into the phone’s mike to produce, about 20 seconds later, an emotional analysis. Beyond Verbal executives say the app is mostly for self-diagnosis—and a bit of fun: It pairs a cartoon face with each analysis, and users can share the face on Facebook or in a tweet or email. But the app is coming out as the company and other developers—many clustered in Tel Aviv—push increasingly sophisticated hardware and software they say can determine a person’s emotional state through analysis of his or her voice. These companies say the tools can also detect fraud, screen airline passengers and help a call-center technician better deal with an irate customer. And they can be used to keep tabs on employees or screen job applicants. One developer, Tel Aviv-based Nemesysco Ltd., offers what it calls “honesty maintenance” software aimed at human-resource executives. The firm says that by analyzing a job applicant’s voice during an interview, the program can help identify fibs. That’s raising alarm among many voice-analysis experts, who question the accuracy of such on-the-spot interpretations. It’s also raising worries among privacy advocates, who say such technology—especially if it is being rolled out in cheap, easy-to-use smartphone apps—could be a fresh threat to privacy in the digital age.

oldfilmsflicker:

angelclark:

How To Read A 223-Page Novel In Just 77 Minutes 

Spritz is a company that makes a speed-reading technology which allows you to get through a mass of text, reading every word, in a fraction of the time it would take if you were turning the pages of a book or swiping through a Kindle.

The basis of Spritz concept is that much of the time spend reading is “wasted” on moving your eyes from side to side, from one word to the next. By flashing the words quickly, one after the other, all in the same place, eye movement is reduced almost to zero. All that’s left is the time you take to process the word before the next one appears.

The company is selling licenses for other companies who might want to use the technology in operating systems, applications, wearables, and websites. Obviously, the tiny screen of a smart watch instantly springs to mind.

But the real revelation of Spritz is in trying it yourself.

holy crap

(Source: noarmycanstopanidea.com, via moonflowerlights)